Alternate History

A Brief Timeline of the Alternate History Fandom

The speculative fiction community is divided into unique sets of fandom. These fandoms are not just defined by what they like, but also how they speak and dress. Even the means of communication and where they congregate plays a role. So its not surprising that even a sub-genre like alternate history has a thriving, if small, […]

Review – The Fictional Man by Al Ewing

Niles Golan is an ex-pat Brit in Hollywood. Never grown-up, he narrates his life with an internal monologue transforming his everyday inadequacies into triumphs. Niles is his own fictional creation: to himself, a genius novelist akin to the young Thomas Pynchon; to everyone else, the hack who writes the popular Kurt Power adventures novels. His […]

Review: The Draka Series

The world of the Draka is the dark reflection of our own world. The core idea behind the series is that refugees from British North America settle South Africa (captured in the war) instead of Canada.

Review: Himmler’s War

Himmler’s War by Robert Conroy Writing alternate history (and period fiction) is a tricky task. There is always the temptation to bend details for the sake of a good story – and then there will be some humourless reader who will then write long posts on why it couldn’t happen the way you suggested. I […]

Review: First Citizen by Thomas T. Thomas

Paperback: 384 pages Publisher: Baen; First Edition edition (December 1, 1987) First Citizen by Thomas T. Thomas Julius Caesar is one of the few figures from Ancient History to be recognisable almost everywhere, although most of what people know about him is wrong. At base, Caesar was a mass of contradictions, often caused by Republican Rome’s deeply […]

Review: Lucy’s Blade

Lucy’ Blade John Lambshead Baen Books Kindle $6.83 Lucy’s Blade is a deeply frustrating book. There is a core of a very good story here; I enjoyed reading it immensely. On the other hand, there are flaws within the book that detract from my enjoyment and leave me wondering just what the editor was doing. […]

Convincing vs. Amazing: Balancing Your SF World

Author Paul J. McAuley (author of  “A Very British History“, one of my favorite short stories) recently tweeted: The trouble with SF ‘worldbuilding’ is that it too often strives to be dully convincing, instead of amazing. I couldn’t agree more. Take The Lost Fleet series by John G. Hemry under the pen name Jack Campbell. The story follows the protagonist […]

Unforgiven

Crossroads: The Western Hero in Speculative Fiction

Someone once said that every story starts with someone either coming to town, or leaving town. And there is no genre for which this adage holds more true than the western. It probably takes us all of a second and a half to recognize the western hero, whether he’s wearing the stereotypical white hat or […]

Elementary, my dear Watson-bot 2.0!

Crime and punishment. Both words are synonymous with genre fiction. Whether it is the flashy superhero racing to stop the next crisis or the “I’m too old for this shit” beat cop who stumbles upon a global conspiracy, we enjoy seeing criminals being taken down. For the next few weeks, however, I am going to be concerning […]

What You Will Find Here

Since January 2nd of 2013, members of the Amazing Stories blog team (you’ll find them all listed under Staff where you can learn more about them) have been writing away on their favorite subjects.  Chances are, you’ll find a few whose favorite subjects are your favorite subjects. In addition to the new content being added […]

A Defining Moment for Science Fiction

The word Science Fiction is recognizable to the average fan, but the definition can be indistinguishable from other genre and cause confusion. Perhaps from the standpoint of the fandom, this vague categorization is by design and allows readers to broaden their focus.