When A Hobby Becomes An Identity

Morgana does the self-observational thing regarding her fannishness: I am happy in my self-awareness and my obsessiveness and my over-thinking-it-ness. I am happy to live partially in my head…

Thank You, Hayao Miyazaki

As we grow older, we are forced to accept the fact that those people who helped to form our childhood are also getting older. We are made to understand that being influential does not make one immortal, at least not in a literal sense. And so, thousands of people the world over are slowly coming to terms with the fact that Hayao Miyazaki is truly, truly retiring this time.

Why Hollywood Needs to Stay Out of Anime (At Least For Now)

Media apologists everywhere would have you believe that Hollywood only runs the way that it does because of this concept called “marketability.” We could never have Asian-American headliners in an Akira movie because we don’t have enough big-name Asian-American actors. We can’t keep the integrity of the original story because it’s not culturally significant to an American audience. God forbid a movie challenge an audience’s perspective on another culture or give them an insight into how other parts of the world react to certain situations

Characters That Will Always Remain

Is anime a way for some of us to retain our childhood fancies? Or do we recognize ourselves in the characters we’ve chosen to admire? Morgana Santilli discusses her reasons for her favorite characters when she was younger and how her preference have changed with growing up.

Ooky Spooky Animanga Part V: The Japanese Fascination with Spirits

Every culture has its ghost stories. Here in the West, ours tend toward narratives depicting souls who died violent deaths and have returned to take revenge. Or perhaps we tell tales of those who have died too soon and only wish for eternal playmates. As I briefly mentioned in my post last week, the Japanese have a very rich and far-reaching pantheon of spooks. The majority of these ghosts and their stories grew out of the Edo period (1603-1867; thus why a show like Mononoke asserts itself as particularly Japanese horror), and ghost stories with a certain antiquated style to them, or an air of the past, are usually referred to as kaiden (mysterious or strange recited narrative), whereas more modern horror stories would simply be called hora (a Japanization of “horror”).

Ooky Spooky Animanga Part IV: Anime Horror At Its Finest

The time has finally come for me to attempt to review a series that I can find zero fault with, a series which is pure perfection. I touched upon it briefly, months ago, in my post “It’s Pretty – And Deadly: Horror Animanga.” But it’s finally time for a full review of Toei Animation’s Mononoke.

Ooky Spooky Animanga Part III: The Titilating Terror of Junji Ito

[Note: The following post contains some images that are visually disturbing. It is recommended that the reader use caution.] Do you like your comics with heavy inking? With a bit of body horror? With gruesome forays into the darkest parts of the human psyche? With afterwords that border on slapstick? If so, allow me introduce […]

Animanga: Surprisingly Not A Man’s World

I am glad that I’ve never had to defend myself and what I love because of something so trivial as my gender expression. I can only hope that the entirety of fandom can grow to this point and further as dialogues surrounding hobbies and sexism continue to spring forth.

Swimming Anime – Not Just Fan Service (Really!)

Back in March, the studio Animation Do released a trailer for a nameless anime about a group of hunky male swimmers.  The trailer caught fire on the internet, with folks all over begging for an anime to follow.  In July of this year that anime, based on the light novel High Speed! by Koji Oji, […]